Friday, April 22, 2016

Kid Lit Blog Hop April 2016 #Linkup #KidLitHop #KLBH, #A-ZChallenge



Hello! Welcome to the April 2016  Kid Lit Blog Hop. This month, I am asking you to go back through all of the posts I have made for the month of April. With the exception of a couple post, each and every one is a review for a children's book. I have found some really great literature and shared them. Some are surprisingly funny, including one from a well-known star. Several of the books I purchased for my collections, others I utilized the local library. Hope you enjoy them. I will come by to see you soon! 

This exciting,monthly hop, is where we develop an engaged group of people who love everything that has to do with children's literature. Everyone is welcome to join us: bloggers, authors, publicist, and publishers!


Simply make a post related to Children’s literature and add it to the linky. (Please make sure to add your direct post only) If you are an author, feel free just to link to your blog.


Once you are done, then hop around to visit others. Please follow the co-host and visit at least the two people above your link. Please leave a comment when you do visit, we all like those.
Also, it would be appreciated if you grab the Kid Lit Blog Hop Badge and display it on your blog and/or your post.


We would also be grateful if you tweet about the blog hop. Let’s grow this wonderful community.


Our next hop will be May 17, 2016. The hostess will be around to see you. Happy Hopping! ~Naila Moon

Reading Authors, Hostess

Julie Grasso

Cheryl Carpinello

BeachBoundBooks

Pragmatic Mom

The Logonauts

A Book Long Enough


Hits and Misses

#Review: Separate Is Never Equal: Sylvia Mendez & Her Family's Fight for Desegregation by Duncan Tonatiuh #Multicultural




Summary:
Almost 10 years before Brown vs. Board of Education, Sylvia Mendez and her parents helped end school segregation in California. An American citizen of Mexican and Puerto Rican heritage who spoke and wrote perfect English, Mendez was denied enrollment to a “Whites only” school. Her parents took action by organizing the Hispanic community and filing a lawsuit in federal district court. Their success eventually brought an end to the era of segregated education in California.

My review:

Before the Brown vs. Board of Education, which is well known to me, there was the Mendez family who fought for equality in the schools. I find it awful that such things have even taken place in this country, although, I know it has.

I applaud people like the Mendez's who fought for their children to have good education. All children deserve to have the same opportunities. This story follows them from the time the children were rejected right through the court case and back to the school.

I should not be, but I was amazed at the bigotry provided by the school, especially when the children were present at the case. Again, I question why?

In the back of the book, there is an update by the author, photographs of the real people involved, a glossary, and bibliography.

The illustrations in the book were simple line drawing and added to the feel. The colors were muted blues, browns, reds, and greens. I thought it was interesting that none of the character's faces were faced forward but always sideways. Was this a statement in itself? Perhaps.

Overall, I think this is a book that should be read to all children and the case should be brought to the public more as this was just the beginning of children's right to school. 

5 stars! Note: This book has received at least two rewards but I was not able to find which ones for my review.

Disclosure: I picked up a copy of this book at my local library to read and review. The opinions expressed here are 100% my own and may differ from yours. ~Naila Moon

Where to find the author:


Amazon
Goodreads


Tuesday, April 19, 2016

#Review: People by Peter Spier #Multicultural


My review:
As the title suggests, this book is all about people. People of every nation, people around the world, people of every color and creed. I love this book because it takes an in depth look of how we all live, dress, worship, play, and enjoy life without prejudice.

The book gives children an idea of how being different is ok. However, it does not shy away from the fact that when we are different, that other people may not like us but, it is still ok to be the way we are. The author shows us that in our differences we are still all human beings, we are born as babies and die at some point.

The colors of this book are amazing:blues, reds,yellows, greens, and browns. The illustrations are all pen drawn with the colors added. This adds to the whole feel of the book and once again, highlights the title, "People".

The author has been awarded several awards for the book and it is without a doubt deserving of my 5 stars. This should be in every home, library, and classroom.

Disclosure: I obtained a copy of this book from my local library. The views here are 100% my own and may differ from yours. ~Naila Moon


Where to find the author:

Amazon

Monday, April 18, 2016

#Review: Octopus Hug by Laurence Pringle/Illustrated by Kate Salley Palmer #Multicultural





Summary:
When Mom goes out for the evening, Becky and Jesse start to bicker. But then Dad gives them an octopus hug, and the house is soon rocking with laughter.

My review:
This is a great book for kids that need time with their dads. The book shows a dad who takes responsibility for his children while mom goes out for the night. When the children start fussing, he makes up all sorts of games that get the kids interacting with him and laughing the whole way.

I felt this was a good book for dads to read to his children and maybe even have fun as they read. I loved that it put good dads in a great spotlight; as often times I think really good dads whether they are present in the home or not, get seen as no good or responsible.

The illustrations are done in pencil color on a white background. The imagination games are seen in muted colors in the background.

Kudos and 5 stars for making a nice multicultural-ed picture book.

Disclosure: I obtained this book from my local library. The views here are 100% my own and may differ from yours. ~Naila Moon

Where to find the author:
Amazon

Sunday, April 17, 2016

#Review: Nighttime Ninja by Barbara DaCosta / Illustrated by Ed Young #atozchallenge




Summary:
Late at night, when all is quiet and everyone is asleep, a ninja creeps silently through the house in search of treasure. Soon he reaches his ultimate goal...and gets a big surprise! Will the nighttime ninja complete his mission?

My review:
The title of this book caught my attention which is why I purchased it without really looking through it. I usually at least do a quick flip. If I had done so, I would have known this is essentially a picture book with very few words. The book is targeted for kids 4-7 but in truth, I think it is more 2-5 and only that high in age because an emerging reader could handle it.

The book starts out really cute, as the reader has to turn the book sideways to the first two pages, to see black and gray ninjas coming down the page. One appears largely on the second page.
The book then has a myriad of  pages with this ninja making different moves and being very stealth.

He finally gets to his goal which is in the kitchen but gets stopped at the most unlikely character. I will not reveal what he is after or who stops him because well, it would ruin the entire story.

I have to say, I was really not impressed with this book. I thought there could have been so much more writing done to make it even cuter. Also, the artwork was done with paper cuttings which are fine but when the artist put the pages together, I could see the white lines of the pages and could tell it was not put together well. That was unfortunate. I think it would have been better with another form of artwork

I will give this book 3 stars but only because the premise is cute and young kids might like it. The author had a good idea but, it just went sour. It is not one I personally would reread. 

Disclosure: I purchased this book for my own collections. The views here are 100% my own and may differ from yours. ~Naila Moon

Where to find the author:
Goodreads
Amazon

Friday, April 15, 2016

#Review: Maya's Mural by Lucia Gomez / Illustrated by Lorraine Sylvestri #DiverseBooks #atozchallenge #multicultural




My review:
This is the story of Maya who was diagnosed with polio as a young girl during the time of polio outbreaks in the 1930's. The story opens post-polio times, three years later, with Maya sitting at the window watching other kids head off to the pool.

Maya had an internal conflict as the other children seemingly are afraid of her. Through her homeschool studies,she learns about an artist named Diego Rivera who paints large murals of his Mexican culture. Maya convinces her parents to paint murals on her fence outside.

In time, children as well as adults, learn about Maya and come to appreciate her talents. Through her murals, they learn that Maya is much more that just "the polio girl."  Maya gains confidence that she lost and learns to make new friends and regain some old.

I liked that this book showed someone with a disability as more than just her disability. Those people are just people that have thoughts, feelings, and dreams just like anyone else, they want to be included. I also liked that those who did not have a disability worked at knowing Maya by asking her questions, even the hard ones, and looked at her work .

The book ended on a positive outcome which is not always the case in real life but none-the-less this time, it worked for me.  I give the book 4 stars.

Disclosure: I purchased this book for my own collections. The view here is 100% my own and may differ from yours. ~Naila Moon

NOTE: As with all books, I research on Amazon and Goodreads to give credit to the author where credit is due. I was only able to find this book on Amazon ( I added it to Goodreads)but there was no photo of the author, no summary was attached and can only be purchased through third parties. The book was apparently a book created as part of the Macmillan-McGraw-Hill instructional books to teach reading. 
My review will still be able to be found on Amazon and Goodreads.

#Review: Little Beaver's Gift by Janet Cassidy / Illustrated by Marni Backer #atozchallenge #Multicultural #NativeAmerican #DiverseBooks





My review:

This book tells the tale of Benny, the smallest boy in 5th grade and scouting. He is bullied by another boy who is much bigger and popular. The boys go on a Scout trip which results in Benny hiding from the other boys in a cave where he cannot be seen. Benny discovers an inner cave that seems to be inhabited. This leads to the discovery of a boy named Little Bear and friendship and growth emerge.

I liked this book because Little Bear teaches Benny about another culture as he shares food and life skills with him. Benny learns to be confident through the help of Little Bear and his family. He learns that friendships go both ways and that different people can learn from each other.
In the end, Benny can stand up to his bully.

Although this book is a work of fiction, I learned a little about the real native nation, the Lenape of which Little Beaver was from. This is a nation that I was unfamiliar with and the book compelled me to learn about them as I am sure it would children reading the book.

The illustrations in this book were dark browns, muted reds and yellows. The characters faces were either non-existent, which played on a  pseudo dream sequence throughout the book, or exaggerated to still not give facial features.

I did think the book ended abruptly but this did not take away from the overall feel and messages of the story.

It is my hope that children who may get the chance to read the book get the running themes. I give this book 4 stars.

Disclosure: I purchased a copy of this book for my own collections. The views here are 100% my own and may differ from yours. ~Naila Moon

NOTE: As with all books, I research on Amazon and Goodreads to give credit to the author where credit is due. I was only able to find this book on Amazon but there was no photo of the book or author, no summary was attached and can only be purchased through third parties. The book was apparently a "spotlight book" that were created as part of the Macmillan-McGraw-Hill instructional books to teach vocabulary. This is unfortunate as the book should now be in the hands of children in the new millennium. My review will still be able to be found on Amazon.